Traffic Technology Today.com
Subscribe to Traffic Technology
Subscribe to Traffic Technology
   Sort by: relevance most recent
  

NEWS >>

Consortium applies to trial autonomous trucks in the Netherlands

Under a plan by a group of logistics and technology companies, self-driving or autonomous trucks could begin delivering goods from Rotterdam, Europe’s largest port, to other cities in the Netherlands within five years. The country’s Infrastructure and Environment Minister, Melanie Schultz van Haegen, has already written to the Netherlands Parliament, presenting the plan and seeking to review and update the country’s traffic laws in order to accommodate the large-scale testing of the self-driving technology on public roads. Schultz van Haegen’s letter explains that initial testing would start on computer simulations and the trucks will be tested on a closed track, before ultimately being piloted on public roads. Her letter states that a detailed proposal of where and how the trials will take place will be submitted to parliament after the summer. Spokeswoman for the Ministry of Infrastructure and Environment, Marianne Wuite, said, “We really want to seek out international partners to see what we can do in this field. There are countless benefits. Self-driving cars need less space and therefore use asphalt more efficiently; they avert traffic jams and reduce accidents. They are also more environmentally friendly.”

The application was submitted by a consortium including: the industry group, Transport and Logistics Netherlands; DAF Trucks; Rotterdam Port and the Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO). “We want to do the first demonstrations in the beginning of next year and roll out the trial in a controlled environment as soon as possible,” said Bastiaan Krosse, a spokesman for TNO. “The road trial, involving two full-sized trucks driving in what is called a ‘platoon’, with the second truck driverless, could happen in the Rotterdam Port, or on or at the A270; a motorway with advanced infrastructure in the southern Netherlands. The goal is to develop a reliable system over the next five years. Similar experiments are underway in other European countries, but what makes this unique is that no other project has a hard target of bringing this to market within five years, with the backing of the government.”

June 18, 2014

Email


RECEIVE THE
LATEST NEWS


Your email address:



Monthly Poll >>

In the US, what percentage of crashes happen at intersections?

MAGAZINE >>

Read latest issueNEW DIGITAL EDITION:

The August/September 2018 issue of Traffic Technology International is now online.

Click here to read digital version
Click here to subscribe

Read now >>

INTERTRAFFIC WORLD >>

Read latest issueNEW DIGITAL EDITION:

Intertraffic World 2018 showcase is now online.


Click here to read digital version
Click here to subscribe

Read now >>

TOLLTRANS >>

Read latest issueNEW DIGITAL EDITION:

Tolltrans 2018 is now online.



Click here to read digital version
Click here to subscribe

Read now >>